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An elderly master carpenter was ready to retire. He told his employer of his plans to leave the house building business and live a more leisurely life with his wife enjoying his extended family.

He would miss the paycheck, but he needed to retire. They could get by. The contractor was sorry to see his good worker go and asked if he could build just one more house as a personal favor. The carpenter said yes, but in time it was easy to see that his heart was not in his work. He resorted to shoddy workmanship and used inferior materials. It was an unfortunate way to end his career. When the carpenter finished his work and the builder came to inspect the house, the contractor handed the front-door key to the carpenter. “This is your house,” he said, “my gift to you.”

Source Unknown

 Note from the editor:

I like this illustration because it’s an excellent metaphor for our lives. Of course we never earn our salvation, but the quality of our lives is largely determined by what we put into them. If we cut corners, treat people with disdain or contempt, ultimately we are the ones who suffer. In our lives, we are all building something, and the question is, what quality of craftsmanship is being used? Will the house fall apart quickly when we leave this earth, or will there be a legacy left behind with those with whom we live, work, worship, and play?

Blessings,

Stu

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