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In the sacrament of communion, we celebrate our union with Christ and also with the family of God.  As we do this, we come up against the human struggle to live in unity, which plays out in many places, including the church.

I feel tempted to despair at times. It’s obvious that we are reaching an inflection point in our lives and ministries. John Mark Comer, in his latest book, Live No Lies, argues that we are moving from a culture of “widespread tolerance” to a culture of “rising hostility.”

What does this look like? It looks like an increasingly separated and segmented society. It looks like litigation instead of conversation, rage instead of civility. It seems easier sometimes to stay at a distance. Bob Goff posted on Twitter a few days ago, “Most of us spend our entire lives avoiding the people Jesus spent His whole life engaging.”

What about your church? Is it a safe place for people to build relationships across social, cultural, political, generational lines? As you celebrate communion, how are you reflecting unity in your congregational life? Perhaps we might start small, and start with ourselves, by seeking a closer connection at the communion table with someone who thinks or acts differently than we do.

Blessings in Christ,

Stu

Stu Headshot

This reflection first appeared in our weekly newsletter. To get content like this, along with our weekly selections from our library, click here.

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